The Top 50 Personal Development Blogs of 2012

It’s finally here: this years Top 50 Personal Development blogs of 2012.

As you know I tried to do it a little different from last year to try and whittle the numbers down a bit.  Last year we had 200 nominees and this year we had 70 nominees.  Upon reflection I will leave the voting open to 3 votes per person, as I did last year.  It’s more work, however we will get a more comprehensive listing of the personal development blogs out there.

You can see this years nominations here

How are the top 50 selected?

To make it as fair as possible I totally changed the way the top 50 was calculated from last year.  Each blog was scored out of 100 using 5 areas.

The 5 main areas that I concentrated on, were weighted as follows:

Number of votes – 15% of total score 

Klout Score – 15% of total score (if someone didn’t have a Klout account they were given a Klout score of 30, however there were only 7 people who didn’t have one)

Avg Number of posts per week – 15% of total score

Avg number of comments per post – 20% of total score

Quality score – 35% of total score.  This was broken down into a further 3 areas: Blog design(10%), Navigation(10%). and content (15%)

So if someone received the most votes they would receive the highest score of 15 in ‘the number of votes’ category as was the case with Jeff Friend, and everyone else’s score would be weighted.  The person with the highest Klout score was Leo Babauta with 81, so he received 15 points for being top and everyone else received a score going down to 0 depending where they were on the table.  The avg number of posts per week; 15 points was awarded to Ben Rolnik, however he didn’t score high enough in the other areas for him to make it into the top 50.

Quality score was a mark out of 35:  10 for design, 10 for navigation and 15 for content.  This is, of course, the subjective part of the contest, however I again had certain criteria to look for when I was marking.  e.g. in the navigation area I was looking for: A good about page, a search function, a contact page, a subscribe area, an archives feature, and a social media subscribe area, this ruled out as much of the subjectivity as possible.

Content was not just about the writing, it was about the post structure, images in post, ability to share and most important the writing itself.

I hope you agree I couldn’t make the marking any fairer than I have, so favouritism was taken out of the equation, and objectivity was the name of the game.  

Anyways onto the winner of this years top 50.

Top 50 Personal Development Blogs of 2012

#50 – Jamie Flexman
www.psycholocrazy.com/

Votes – 1
Klout Score – 26
No Posts p/w – 1.6
No Comments avg – 2.2
Quality Score – 24

Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#49 – Roman Soluk
www.oplife.org/

Votes – 1
Klout Score – 38
No Posts p/w – 1.7
No Comments avg – 1.8
Quality Score – 24


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#48 – Melissa Curran
www.findyourparadigm.com/

Votes – 5
Klout Score – 50
No Posts p/w – 0.9
No Comments avg – 1.7
Quality Score – 23


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#47 – David Singer
www.sixsimplerules.com/

Votes – 6
Klout Score – 40
No Posts p/w – 0.9
No Comments avg – 3.8
Quality Score – 22


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#46 – Jackie Walker
jackiewalker.me/

Votes – 6
Klout Score – 48
No Posts p/w – 0.7
No Comments avg – 1.2
Quality Score – 23


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#45 – Jamie Alexander
lucidability.com/

Votes – 11
Klout Score – 29
No Posts p/w – 0.6
No Comments avg – 5.5
Quality Score – 23


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#44 – Suzie Cheel
suziecheel.com/

Votes – 3
Klout Score – 68
No Posts p/w – 0.6
No Comments avg – 5.2
Quality Score – 21


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#43 – Dennis Do
selfexceed.com/

Votes – 5
Klout Score – 52
No Posts p/w – 0.6
No Comments avg – 4
Quality Score – 23


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#42 – Melissa Reyes
mizmeliz.com/

Votes – 3
Klout Score – 62
No Posts p/w – 2.3
No Comments avg – 1.5
Quality Score – 17


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#41 – Dragos Roua
www.dragosroua.com/

Votes – 3
Klout Score – 66
No Posts p/w – 0.9
No Comments avg – 0.3
Quality Score – 24


Blog | Facebook Twitter |

#40 – Amit Sodha
www.unlimitedchoice.org/blog

Votes – 3
Klout Score – 47
No Posts p/w – 0.7
No Comments avg – 14
Quality Score – 22


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#39 – Stephanie Mulac
infiniteevolutioncenter.com/

Votes – 22
Klout Score – 51
No Posts p/w – 0.7
No Comments avg – 0.2
Quality Score – 21


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#38 – Angela Goodeve
lifeadvicethecoachingway.blogspot.co.uk/

Votes – 5
Klout Score – 61
No Posts p/w – 0.6
No Comments avg – 4.8
Quality Score – 21


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#37 – Sarupa Shah
www.sarupashah.com/

Votes – 12
Klout Score – 29
No Posts p/w – 1.3
No Comments avg – 3.2
Quality Score – 23


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#36 – Tamarisk Saunders-Davies
tamarisksd.com/

Votes – 25
Klout Score – 30
No Posts p/w – 1.4
No Comments avg – 2.7
Quality Score – 20


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#35 – Otiti
www.otitijasmine.com/

Votes – 1
Klout Score – 46
No Posts p/w – 0.7
No Comments avg – 18.6
Quality Score – 21


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#34 – Evita Ochel
evolvingbeings.com/

Votes – 2
Klout Score – 49
No Posts p/w – 1.7
No Comments avg – 2.1
Quality Score – 25


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#33 – Holly Worton
ready2bloom.com/

Votes – 5
Klout Score – 59
No Posts p/w – 1.4
No Comments avg – 0.8
Quality Score – 22

Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#32 – Joe Wilner
shakeoffthegrind.com/

Votes – 1
Klout Score – 51
No Posts p/w – 1.6
No Comments avg – 5.4
Quality Score – 24

Blog Facebook | Twitter |

#31 – Evelyn Lym
www.abundancetapestry.com/

Votes – 1
Klout Score – 47
No Posts p/w – 1.6
No Comments avg – 10.3
Quality Score – 24


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#30 – Brendan Baker
www.startofhappiness.com/

Votes – 5
Klout Score – 53
No Posts p/w – 0.9
No Comments avg – 6.1
Quality Score – 27


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#29 – Arvind Devalia
www.arvinddevalia.com/blog/

Votes – 20
Klout Score – 53
No Posts p/w – 0.3
No Comments avg – 7
Quality Score – 25


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#28 – Tess Marshall
theboldlife.com/

Votes – 2
Klout Score – 54
No Posts p/w – 1
No Comments avg – 16.7
Quality Score – 22


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#27 – Galen Pearl
10stepstofindingyourhappyplace.blogspot.co.uk/

Votes – 1
Klout Score – 30
No Posts p/w – 1.4
No Comments avg – 46.7
Quality Score – 19

Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#26 – Alex Blackwell
www.thebridgemaker.com

Votes – 2
Klout Score – 50
No Posts p/w – 1.3
No Comments avg – 15
Quality Score – 24


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#25 – Taslim Jaffer
www.letmeoutcreative.com/blog/

Votes – 40
Klout Score – 45
No Posts p/w – 1.4
No Comments avg – 3.3
Quality Score – 20


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#24 – Anne-Sophie Reinhardt
amindmedia.com/

Votes – 22
Klout Score – 30
No Posts p/w – 6
No Comments avg – 1.1
Quality Score – 24


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#23 – Victor Schueller
www.victorschueller.com/

Votes – 5
Klout Score – 56
No Posts p/w – 2.1
No Comments avg – 4.2
Quality Score – 23


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#22 – Betsy Henry
www.zen-mama.com/

Votes – 1
Klout Score – 60
No Posts p/w – 0.7
No Comments avg – 29.4
Quality Score – 20


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#21 – Justin Mazza
www.mazzastick.com/

Votes – 6
Klout Score – 43
No Posts p/w – 1.1
No Comments avg – 18.5
Quality Score – 23

Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#20 – Craig Morton
www.ignitechange.net/

Votes – 32
Klout Score – 49
No Posts p/w – 2.4
No Comments avg – 1.4
Quality Score – 23


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#19 – Angela Artemis
www.poweredbyintuition.com/

Votes – 6
Klout Score – 54
No Posts p/w – 1.1
No Comments avg – 15
Quality Score – 22

Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#18 – Ken Wert
meanttobehappy.com/

Votes – 2
Klout Score – 42
No Posts p/w – 1
No Comments avg – 25
Quality Score – 26


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#17 – Stephen Borgman
www.personal-success-factors.com/

Votes – 5
Klout Score – 50
No Posts p/w – 0.9
No Comments avg – 22
Quality Score – 23


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#16 – Dani DiPirro
www.positivelypresent.com/

Votes – 1
Klout Score – 55
No Posts p/w – 2.1
No Comments avg – 7.9
Quality Score – 20


Blog | Facebook | Twitter ||

#15 – Paige Burkes
www.simplemindfulness.com/

Votes – 11
Klout Score – 62
No Posts p/w – 0.7
No Comments avg – 12.6
Quality Score – 24


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#14 – Arianna Merritt
ariannasrandomthoughts.com/

Votes – 36
Klout Score – 47
No Posts p/w – 2.3
No Comments avg – 8.5
Quality Score – 22


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#13 – Zeenat Merchant-Syal
positiveprovocations.com/

Votes – 13
Klout Score – 62
No Posts p/w – 0.7
No Comments avg – 13
Quality Score – 24

Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#12 – Sandi Amorim
www.devacoaching.com/blog/

Votes – 8
Klout Score – 64
No Posts p/w – 1.6
No Comments avg – 10.3
Quality Score – 24

Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#11 – Leo Babauta
zenhabits.net/

Votes – 1
Klout Score – 81
No Posts p/w – 2
No Comments avg – 10
Quality Score – 26


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#10 – Jeffrey Friend
www.kaizenways.com

Votes – 84
Klout Score – 63
No Posts p/w – 1.1
No Comments avg – 8.4
Quality Score – 23


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#9 – Elle Sommer
www.reflectingalife.com/

Votes – 12
Klout Score – 48
No Posts p/w – 2.1
No Comments avg – 16.4
Quality Score – 26


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#8 – Tim Brownson
www.adaringadventure.com/

Votes – 1
Klout Score – 65
No Posts p/w – 2.3
No Comments avg – 17.8
Quality Score – 28 


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#7 – Vidya Sury
vidyasury.com/

Votes – 2
Klout Score – 69
No Posts p/w – 2.7
No Comments avg – 23.5
Quality Score – 23 


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#6 – Jodi Chapman
www.jodichapman.com

Votes – 12
Klout Score – 70
No Posts p/w – 2
No Comments avg – 14.1
Quality Score – 24


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#5 – Marquita Herald
www.inspiredgiftgiving.com

Votes – 12
Klout Score – 53
No Posts p/w – 2
No Comments avg – 21.7
Quality Score – 25


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#4 – Celestine Chua
personalexcellence.co

Votes – 11
Klout Score – 56
No Posts p/w – 4
No Comments avg – 33.7
Quality Score – 25


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#3 – Izmael Arkin (Izzy)
30yearoldninja.com/

Votes – 20
Klout Score – 47
No Posts p/w – 1.9
No Comments avg – 44.5
Quality Score – 25


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

We have joint winners this year.

congratulations to:

 


#1 – Melody Fletcher
www.deliberateblog.com/


Votes – 1
Klout Score – 62
No Posts p/w – 2.1
No Comments avg – 56.1
Quality Score – 28

Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

#1 – Michael Hyatt
michaelhyatt.com/

Votes – 1
Klout Score – 80
No Posts p/w – 2.7
No Comments avg – 75.3
Quality Score – 26


Blog | Facebook | Twitter |

Please leave a comment to congratulate all the bloggers listed.  

A huge thank you to everyone who voted, all 1,200 of you :) We’ll do it

all again next year

Winners badges 

If you are in the top 50 you can proudly display this badge on your website:

<a href=”http://www.stevenaitchison.co.uk/blog/the-top-50-personal-development-blogs-of-2012-2”><img src=http://www.stevenaitchison.co.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/top-50-personal-development-blog-2012.fw_.png></a> 

Melody and Michael can use this badge

 

 

<a href=”http://www.stevenaitchison.co.uk/blog/the-top-50-personal-development-blogs-of-2012-2”><img src=http://www.stevenaitchison.co.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/winner-award.jpg></a>

Some Amazing Comments

comments

About Steven Aitchison

I am the creator of Change Your Thoughts (CYT) blog and love writing and speaking about personal development, it truly is my passion. There are over 500 articles on this site from myself and some great guest posters.
If you want to learn more about my products you can check out Steven Aitchison's Products or check out my books and Kindle books on Amazon

Comments

  1. Liz Smith says:

    Hi, are you doing this again? If so, can I nominate my favorite blog http://www.LifeOhm.com? Thanks.

  2. It’s nice to read so many articles that are inspiring.I wish to have the mind of writing great ideas that will help readers.

  3. Great post Steve and handy for me as I am compiling my own list of sites that I have come across that are informative and actually do help people! :)
    It was refreshing to see some different names in there as most of the ‘best of’ lists show the same old faces, so well done you!

  4. Steve thanks so much for this informative blog post! I came across an old post of yours with the best sites and found many blogs on that list, still alive and well; this was encouraging! I am trying to learn all I can about personal development and this exhaustive list will surely prove useful!

  5. Thanks Steve to compile the top 50 bloggers list. I can’t wait to check out their blogs. Some of blogs are familiar, some of not. But as I know it is quality blog.

  6. Hi Steven, thanks so much for hosting this and putting it all together. I’m simply thrilled I got enough votes and hit #35!! :D

  7. Hi Steven,

    Thanks so much for sharing this super information. I am also passionate about Personal development, but I am new to blogging. I was in search of like minded bloggers to learn from, when I found your blog.

    Thanks again for this great post.

    Catherine

  8. Wow Steve, thankyou for that list. I found some awesome articles on some of those blogs. It will take me a while to go through the list.

    -Ben

  9. Better than the previous one!

  10. Steve,
    I apologize for taking so long to get over here and thank you for the tremendous job you did! You deserve a huge round of applause and a vacation now! :-)

    Of course, I’m honored to be on the list again this year. My congratulations to all!

  11. My heartiest congrats to all the winners listed above and wish you all a very happy and successful life and blogging in new year.

  12. Congratulations to Melody and Michael! I don’t think it’s easy to write a quality blog so I’m very excited that I even made it on the list. Thank you and congratulations to all of us – I believe Steven is a wonderful example of personal development.

    Thank you Steven for hosting your blog each week – you’re email is one of the few I actually look forward to reading!

    Melissa =)

  13. Good list, and the greater list of personal development is the one that exists within each of us, there we can find all the resources to be whatever we want in life.

    Paulo Renato
    http://paulorenatoconsultor.blogspot.pt

  14. Thanks Steve…and everyone who nominated me…I am so honoured to be in the top 50…and to end the year with this award and of course be in such amazing company…wishing you all much joy and of course come and hang out at my blog (www.thesoulagentblog.com) ;)

  15. Thanks so much for this forum, Steve. Congrats to all those who were nominated and those who made the Top 50! Some great blogs by great bloggers and some I can’t wait to “discover.” And a great big congrats to Melody and Michael! Woo Hoo!

    Some of my favorite people are here and I’m just so honored to be amongst them!

    Thank you!

  16. What a great event! Congratulations to Steven for what looks like a huge task, and to everyone who made it onto the list, especially Melody and Michael.

    I’ve really enjoyed going through the finalist’s blogs and have found a few favourites that are now on my Must Read list.

  17. Lot’s go great blogs. Impressed that so many people are passionate about living their passion.

    I’m convinced that there is no more powerful earthly force than one who is able to do what they were born to do for a cause they were born to fight for.

  18. Thank you, Steve, for compiling this fantastic list–and congratulations to everyone here…especially my sweetie, Jodi Chapman! :) So nice to see some other familiar names/blogs as well as some new ones, which I’ll definitely check out. So wonderful to be connected with Jodi and this entire community. Best wishes to everyone for the holidays and beyond.

  19. Wow… Really glad to see Vidya here at #7 in the list :) She’s is such a helpful blogger spreading love and kindness.

    Congratulations to all the awardees and all the best for next year :)

    Great job Steven :)

    Cheers…

  20. Steven, I am just in awe of all of the work you put into this, it truly shows the passion you have for your work, and the advancement of personal development as a whole! I am honored and humbled to make the Top 50!

    Congratulations to everyone who made the list, and to those that didn’t for all of your hard work and own passions for writing and helping others with their personal growth!

    I look forward to reading your blogs, and getting to know you better!

    Peace and Love,

    Ang :)

  21. Steve,
    I’m thrilled to be part of this wonderful group!! So many wonderful blogs here that I truly enjoy. And I look forward to getting to know the ones that I haven’t gotten to know yet.
    Thanks so much!!

  22. Thanks for this list! I’m so happy to have made it on the Top 50 with Ready to Bloom. I look forward to checking out the other bloggers on this list.

    Would it be possible for my Twitter link to be added? It’s @hollyworton.

    Thanks!!

  23. Thanks Steven for including me here! It’s a great company of great bloggers! It’s an honor to be on this list!

  24. Steven,

    thank you so much, I’m honored to be on the list.

  25. Steve,
    I can’t begin to imagine what it took for you to put this together. I’m giving you a 100 for quality! It’s been one of my goals this year to make it to this list and am so honored to make #15. While I see some familiar faces (big congrats Melody!), it’s nice to see so many new ones – more new friends to make! Thank you so much for all that you do!!

    Big Hugs!!!

  26. Hey Steven,

    Thanks for making me part of this, appreciated :) I can’t believe I made it again. There are a few familiar faces in the list, but also a lot of new bloggers and I’m really curious to discover their message.

    Hope you’re doing great (by the way, in my humble opinion, you should be among the winners too :) ).

    Best,
    Dragos

  27. Hi Steve and great bloggers. Thanks for doing this and I”m quite humbled to be included in this list. Great to connect with other quality and talented Personal Development experts. Looking forward to connecting with you all.

  28. Oh wow Steven!! I made the list and I love all the beautiful work you do for us :) *bow* to thee :)
    I love the list, so many new faces and many old friends here…am getting all warm and fuzzy seeing this list.
    CONGRATS to Melody(you know I love you!) and Micheal(Am yet to get to know you, starting now!) !!
    Sending everyone a LOT of glittery love for the new year.
    Much Love,
    Z~

  29. Thanks so much for all of your hard work on this Steve. Awesome!

    Congrats to all of the members of the 2012 Top 50.

    Looking forward to seeing you all in the blogosphere in 2013!

    Best regards,

    David

  30. Once again Steve. Thanks again for putting this together and giving us aspiring personal growth bloggers the spotlight. I truly appreciate your time and energy with this project.

    I will personally go through the list and check out my fellow PD bloggers sites.

    Congrats to them all, especially Melody and Michael. :)

    Take Care.

  31. Wow, I came over to check out the list and was amazed and pleased to find myself on it, especially in such excellent company. I’m very happy to see so many folks on the list I already know, and I eager to meet the ones I don’t. I will definitely be checking out all the ones that are new to me. Thanks for all the effort you put into this. (Okay, what’s a klout score??)

  32. This is a great list. Thanks for taking the time to compile such a useful resource! I’m going to start working my way through the list right now!

  33. Steven what a sterling job you did kiddo. Loved the opportunity to see so many new blogs (to me) and I’m totally blown away to find myself in the top ten. Hey, I’m thrilled to be in this amazing group at all.

    And Melody is so deserving of being a winner – her posts are simply wonderful.

    Hats off to you Steven – you deserve an award yourself. :-)

    Love Elle
    xoxo

  34. Hi Steve (and everyone)!

    Personally for me, I love that you put this list together because it becomes a one stop shop to find great personal development blogs. There are quite a few blogs on this list I have not read. There is so much content out there this list will give me a group of blogs to focus on :).

    This is like a virtual introduction to tons of awesomeness! Thank you Steve for taking the time to put this together.

    I feel really humbled to be placed number 3 among all these folks. Thank you Steve :).

  35. Hi Steve,
    When I first heard about this poll, I thought it was a pretty good idea, but having read through how you allocated the scores, and having looked through the actual scores themselves, I feel like I'd be remiss if I didn't call bullshit on your scoring methodology.

    1. Number of votes is only worth 15 percent of the total score? After all the effort that you went through asking people to vote, and the effort that I'm sure many of these bloggers went through, you then tell them that their votes were, at very best, worth 0.15 of the final score?

    2. You gave equal importance to Klout, which is seriously little more than a meaningless and unscientifically computed number – And that's not just my option:

    http://webstartupacademy.com/your-klout-score-is-bullshit

    http://techcrunch.com/2011/10/26/nobody-gives-a-damn-about-your-klout-score/

    http://www.salon.com/2011/11/13/klout_is_bad_for_your_soul/

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/anthonykosner/2012/05/08/klout-uses-this-trick-to-make-you-feel-bad-about-yourself-dont-let-it-ruin-your-life/

    3. Average number of posts per week. Of what quality? Does link-bait count? Do you count one line posts? Nobody knows, you didn't say. This is 15% of the score, which is as important as the number of votes, and yet all it says is how prolific somebody is – nothing to do with how valuable what they're saying is.

    4. Number of comments per post. Including the author's own? Not? Again, don't know. Is this meaningless chatter? Is this people just piping in with a "yeah! Great post!" or is it people who are actually engaging with the material? This was worth %20 of the vote, which is overall more than any other single item on this list (since 'quality' was broken down into three items).3. You yourself acknowledge that you gave the highest importance to the most subjective part of your rubric – quality. Which I have to say fro where I'm standing sounds like a ridiculously large 'fudge factor'.So where does that land us?

    The "winners" of your contest had *a single vote* each. For all those comments and people buzzing around this person, *only a single person* cared enough to actually vote for them, and the rest of their score was pretty much a mix of arbitrary numbers and your own subjective opinion. The only numbers I can see actually carrying weight is the votes (because we were voting, remember?), and you essentially turned them down in the mix until they meant nothing at all. The fact that you have so many parameters in your rubric that seem totally meaningless when examined in detail makes the entire procedure seem even more subjective.

    Now, it's obviously your award, and you can run it however you want. But maybe the next time I run it, don't even bother asking people to vote. Just ask them to nominate and then figure out who you like best out of that list.

    • Hi Nick

      Thanks for your attack on the scoring system. I’d like to answer each point:

      1. The number of votes a person gets should not be the most important part. The number of votes shows the following of a blogger and their ability to garner support from their fans, which is great, but what if you have a great blogger, putting out amazing stuff, but don’t want to ask their fans to vote for them? It’s the choice of the blogger and I don’t think a heavier weighting would make it any more fair.

      2. Klout is not perfect, nor is it meant to be in this system, it’s just an indication of social media presence and a bloggers interaction with their followers. If there’s another system you can think of to measure social media presence please feel free to let me know about it.

      3. Average number of posts per week is there to show how dedicated a blogger is to their craft. You’re totally right about it now showing the quality of the posts, which is why it only receives a 15% weighting. However a blogger who only posts once every 6 weeks shows that they are not committed to their blog or their followers (please don’t use the excuse that a blogger should only post when they have something worthwhile to say, as that, frankly, is a lot of crap) we are bloggers, we write because we have something to say and find inspiration to help others, that’s what we do. How often would you visit a blog if the author couldn’t be arsed writing at least once every few weeks?

      4. The number of comments was put in to show interactivity between a blogger and their followers, and yes it does include their own comments. It’s also an indication of how well received a post is, if it’s a great post it’s going to be commented on and shared and garner more comments.

      5. Quality score was broken down into three parts and, as I also said, the subjectivity was take out as much as possible by looking for certain things, as follows:

      Design: Is it a bespoke design or out of the box? is it easy to see the posts or is it cluttered with ads? does the design reflect the content? Has any thought been put into the design e.g. header design, branding, colours. Now most of that is about objectivity.

      Navigation:Does it have a search function? Is it easy to subscribe to? Does it have an archives page? Does it have a good about page? Is it easy to contact the blogger? Can a visitor follow the blogger easily on other social media sites? All of these questions are 100% objective, no subjectivity required.
      Content:Writing quality, post structure, use of images, ability to share. The subjective part here is writing quality.

      So, out of the 35% for quality score, about 7% is purely subjective. In total, about 93% is objective and cannot be misconstrued in any way by anybody else. So if you were to look at all the blogs here and used my scoring criteria you would still get the same top 50, more or less.

      The winners of the contest had a single vote each! What is your point here? It’s nothing to do how cared for a blogger is by receiving a single vote, one of the winners didn’t even know they were nominated and didn’t know about the contest, otherwise they would have written to their followers to ask for support, that’s why only 15% is allocated to ‘the number of votes’

      You say that I made it so the number of votes meant nothing at all. Jeff Friend, who came in at position 10, would have been at position 32 had he not had a great following who voted for him to give him 84 votes – tell me how does that mean ‘nothing at all?

      Part of the issue about answering comments like this is that you do absolutely nothing about offering a solution and coming up with a better rubric. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

      • Steven,

        Thanks for your response, before I begin:

        “Part of the issue about answering comments like this is that you do absolutely nothing about offering a solution and coming up with a better rubric. I’d love to hear your thoughts.”

        Answering comments like mine, which point out what I believe are legitimate issues, is just a part of being accountable for for the system you’re championing. Additionally, there’s nothing that says that a critique (let’s use a word more appropriate and less emotionally charged than ‘attack’) needs to offer a better solution. That’s not the function of a critique. A critique exists to point out problems. And you don’t need to have all the answers to point out problems.

        It’s only an *issue* if the points made by the critique hold no merit (I don’t think that’s the case), or if you have no clear answer to them. And since you’ve asked for my opinion, I’m more than happy to oblige.

        I’ll go back over your points one by one.

        1. To reiterate: Your reason for the actual votes somebody receives being such a small part of the overall scoring is that some bloggers wouldn’t feel comfortable asking their audiences to vote for them.

        If that’s the case, and you think this applies to a large number of the participants, then wouldn’t it be even fairer to remove the voting entirely from your system? As I said in my previous comment, that would be fine too, so long as you were up front about it, and said from the beginning that the voting was really just a mechanism to see who was going to be included in your final assessment of the blogs.

        2. It’s disingenuous to say ‘Klout isn’t perfect’. The issue here isn’t that Klout isn’t perfect – nothing’s perfect. There is *no* system that is perfect for measuring ‘social influence’. The real issue here is that Klout is arguably very *far* from perfect. In fact, one of the biggest criticisms that is often levelled at Klout is that in many ways, measuring social influence is impossible.

        Another issue with Klout is that it’s not entirely clear what the basis for it’s calculation is. Here’s the page that tells you how they compute the scores: http://klout.com/corp/klout_score – It’s pretty vague and ambiguous. And most importantly doesn’t actually give you a formula.

        A third issue that not even all the people participating in your poll had Klout scores. You ascribed a rank of 30 to people who didn’t, but there were also people in your poll who had a Klout score less than that – so in effect *not* having a Klout account would have been better for them than having one. Even if this was only 7 people, that’s still 10% of your nominees.

        If you want me to present you with an alternative, or a suggestion on how you could improve this point, it would be: don’t include Klout as a measure in your poll. It is definitely a number, and it certainly seems to be have been measured somewhere, but it’s also a number whose legitimacy is seriously debatable.

        3. To begin with, I’m going to assume that you’re only talking about self-help or motivational blogs, since obviously the answer to this question would be very very different if we were talking about, say, a literary blog, or a scientific blog, or a blog about design or internet technology. And by ‘bloggers’ I’m also assuming you’re talking about the types of people who write those kinds of blogs.

        So, moving on. You acknowledge that this score doesn’t necessarily say anything about the quality of those posts. So we agree entirely on that. The question is, to what end should a figure like this effect the overall ranking of a blog?

        Now, It certainly does show a level of commitment if a blogger is posting six times a week rather than once every six, but what exactly does that ‘level of commitment’ actually mean?

        I know you asked me not to, but I’m afraid I need to say it anyway: a blogger *should* only post when they have something good to say. This isn’t an excuse at all. It’s good sense. It’s only an excuse if a blogger who by right should be posting a few times a week only posts once every six months, and then *says it* to justify their own lack of productivity.

        In the context of a *self help or motivational blog* I absolutely agree I *probably* wouldn’t really bother going there if the author wasn’t motivated enough to post something at least once a week. But that said, If a blogger posted once every two weeks and it was an absolute corker, I’d probably read it every time. It’s also true that if a blogger was posting 8 times a week, then the content would have to be phenomenally good or I wouldn’t want to go there either. You can’t just say ‘bloggers should be prolific’. Bloggers should write the appropriate amount – which is enough to maintain the interest of their audience.

        Now, this is important – there’s no ‘sweet spot’. Or more to the point, the ‘sweet spot’ will be different for every blogger (unless they’re writing a cookie cutter motivational blog – which wouldn’t be on the above list anyway!). Basically the number of posts that a blogger writes is irrelevant if they can maintain the engagement of their audience over time, and actually *motivate* their audience.

        To that end, how should something like post count be ranked if at all? You say in your response that this figure is here to show the blogger’s dedication. However, I don’t think this is an accurate reflection of that. I still think that (as I said originally), it shows how prolific they are, but says nothing of the actual merit of what they say. It may show one facet of the blogger’s dedication, but not in a very reliable fashion.

        Let me illustrate: the following are both possible use cases:

        a) blogger posts motivational quotes – at least three a day. They’re all excellent and she provides a few sentences of reflection on each quote. All very good stuff.

        b) blogger is backpacking around central america, and posts 1 post a fortnight, where he talks about what he’s been doing, who they met, uploads photos, google maps, annotations, etc, and talks at length about how other people can do things just like this.

        Which one of these is more dedicated? I’m certain you’d agree that both are just as dedicated in their own ways.

        If you want to measure dedication, maybe it would be better not to look at the number of posts that a blogger puts out per week, on average, but to look at the *consistency* of posting levels over time. We have to assume that anybody who is a serious contender in this competition isn’t going to fall into the ‘one post every six weeks’ category, as such maybe looking at how that blogger can set their rate of output and stick with it over time makes more sense than just the sheer volume of output?

        Further, to just say “that’s why it only receives a 15% wighting” isn’t really answering this problem. After all, both Klout and the participant vote ALSO receive 15%, so it’s at least as important as those, but to an extent this one is even harder to accurately pin down.

        I’ll point out at this juncture that so far 45% of your total score is currently made up of factors which you have said wouldn’t be fair to count any higher (votes), you can’t really defend the validity of (Klout), and doesn’t accurately reflect what you’re trying to measure (post count).

        4. Your point here makes more sense. But while I agree with this for the most part, I would also point out that you didn’t actually mention any of this in your initial explanation up the top of the page. (This is, by the way, why it’s good to have people who point these things out – it makes you think and talk more rationally about what you’re doing, and why you’re doing it).

        *But*, it’s still not giving the whole picture. In fact, it raises an issue.

        It’s true that this is one of the indicators of how popular a site is, but if we apply this to our rubric, then we are essentially stating that the popularity of a site is equal to its overall quality as a site. And from what I’m getting out of your comments, and also from the overall theme of your ranking in general – it’s the *quality* of the site you’re after, perhaps more than the popularity. Moreover, it’s also true that sites which have more followers will naturally get more comments. This means that if you’re aiming to measuring the ‘level of interactivity between a blogger and their followers’, by making this a tally of overall numbers, you’re still really just taking a measure of their overall popularity.

        Furthermore, you can’t measure ‘interaction’ with just a count of comments. At best, this is just a measure of how many people are ‘talking back’. If you want to measure real interaction, then you should also take into consideration how many times the blogger writes back to the commenters, and how involved the level of the reply is.

        If you want a suggestion on how this might be made better: how about look at the number of comments, then see how many of those comments have a reply from the post author which is of equal length as the original comment? Add additional points if the first commenter then writes back, or if another person then enters the discussions. For example, your response to my original comment would count as interaction, since you answered with a lengthy response. My response here would make that an even more valuable part of the exchange. If somebody else decides to enter the conversation, this would be even better, and so on.

        Now, at this point, I’m going to point out that if we take the comments section to mean the popularity of the blog in general, which as it stands that’s kind of what we’re measuring here, then your current weightings are:

        45% things you wouldn’t want to put any higher because they’re too arbitrary and don’t measure what you want them too properly.

        20% popularity of the site.

        If we just accept that the votes for a site are ALSO a measure of the popularity of a site, then the ranking is currently 35% popularity, and 30% things that are arbitrary.

        And here’s another edge case for you: What if the blogger *turned off their comments*?

        http://thinktraffic.net/debate-should-you-allow-comments-on-your-blog-find-out-what-two-remarkably-popular-bloggers-think

        5. I’m going to have to just hold you up a little here before we go on. You say that there’s only ‘about 7%’ of this which is purely subjective. However, the majority of the points you outlined are *entirely* subjective, since they’re mostly focused on design. It’s true that you can make a checklist of things you think a good site should have, but just because you make it a list doesn’t make it objective. It’s just a list of things you *subjectively* chose as representative of a good design.

        And just what makes good branding? What are good colours? What’s a good header design? Better yet, what are *bad* colours? Is having a search function necessarily a good thing or a bad thing? There are different schools of thought, were you aware? I’ve heard it convincingly argued that a search bar or search function is a sign that your content is not easy enough to navigate, so actually is a sign of *bad* site design.

        Does a page *need* an about page? Or is this information relayed to the audience in some other way? Same for a contact info. Just because you can or can’t share content, what does that have to do with how *good* the content is? If a blogger has issues with Facebook and doesn’t want to link to them, do they get less marks? Hell, I’d say you could argue that they should get *more* marks!!

        All of this, as well as the ‘writing quality’ They are ALL subjective in one way or another. It is not just misleading but plain out wrong to say of this section that ‘93% is objective’.

        Which then leads to the question, given that it’s all subjective, exactly how did these numbers come together? Are you a web site designer? Did you bring one in to judge this portion?

        Again, and this is really the point I think I’m making all the way throughout, if this is to be subjective, so be it, but let’s be open about it. If you want my suggestion for how this could be a better: Get the issues of web site design to be judged by a panel of designers, and then aggregate their scores. Get the part about writing quality to be judged by a panel of bloggers who you trust, and aggregate *their* scores.

        For the record, the way I’m counting your weighting is currently:

        35% popularity (but only 40% or so of *that* is directly counted as such)
        30% things that are arbitrary.
        35% entirely subjective

        6. (you didn’t number this but..) I’m just going to quote you:

        “The winners of the contest had a single vote each! What is your point here? It’s nothing to do how cared for a blogger is by receiving a single vote, one of the winners didn’t even know they were nominated and didn’t know about the contest, otherwise they would have written to their followers to ask for support, that’s why only 15% is allocated to ‘the number of votes’”

        If I follow correctly, you’re saying that if the winners had known that there was a contest, they would have told their followers, who then would have come and voted for them. Which I presume you mean implies that they would have won because of the voting, so that’s why only 15 percent is allocated to votes.

        But Steven, they won *anyway*.

        So what difference would it have made if the votes counted for *more*???

        You can’t say it would make the system less ‘fair’ than it is now. And as I said above there’s at least 30 percent of your weighting which is basically a popularity contest as is.

        And besides, didn’t you say people might not want to get their followers to vote? Look, I’ll be honest, I just don’t know to what degree that’s even true. I wonder if even 10% of the bloggers nominated (about the same as the number of people without Klout scores), if they had all known, would have *not* told their followers, or at least somebody. The way I see it, especially for the type of bloggers that usually run motivational sites, they’re all about networking. And frankly, being nominated for these awards is a great opportunity to network. So I don’t know *why* they wouldn’t direct their visitors here (unless they had some kind of issue with the poll itself, which I can tell by reading the comments is generally NOT the case).

        “You say that I made it so the number of votes meant nothing at all. Jeff Friend, who came in at position 10, would have been at position 32 had he not had a great following who voted for him to give him 84 votes – tell me how does that mean ‘nothing at all?”

        Before I answer, I want to clarify I didn’t say the votes meant nothing at all. I very distinctly said that they meant precisely 15% of your total score, and my point was that this seemed too low. My exact words were:

        My exact words were: “you essentially turned them down in the mix until they meant nothing at all”

        This is not equal to saying that they are meaningless. This is a way of expressing the *emotive sensation* that they *may as well have been* meaningless for *how little a part they played* in the overall scoring. Obviously, because I said ‘essentially’. I’m being pedantic about this because I want to argue the points, not interpretations of them.

        So to spell it out, my *point* is that the voting wasn’t a big part of the overall weighings, but it seemed to be when the whole process began. This story about Jeff Friend is *exactly* my point. Actually, this is about as perfect an example of my point. It’s not just that he went up 20 spots or so. It’s that he *only* went up 20. He received 80 votes, but the way this was calculated, he could have had 80,000, might only have gone up a few more spots higher than that. Do you not agree that’s a good indication that a measurement doesn’t have that much impact on the overall score?

        So, to wrap up, here are my opinions about what would make for a much better, fairer, and more legitimate scoring process:

        Make it 50% vote based, and 50% a panel of judges who are qualified in different fields. Get people whose opinion on web design, and writing content, that you trust, and who are recognised in the community, and get them to score the websites. Then mix that with the overall votes that were received by the public.

        • You make a lot of good points but at the end of the day this was a bit of fun and in no way something ‘official’. Steven didn’t have to do this and everyone who made the list and 99% of the readers were grateful as it allows us all a chance to check out other great blogs that maybe we wouldn’t find by ourselves.

          • I agree with Jamie. I am not sure why I read all of your points, curiosity perhaps. Your suggestions at the very end were good. It’s fine to make suggestions for next time and maybe a short explanation of why it is important to you. I feel as though you could have made them directly to Steven, rather than in an open forum where people are congratulating each other for something that was done purely for fun and in the spirit of motivating each other and gaining a broader perspective. You have taken away some of the joy that being involved with this has brought me. I doubt that was you intent, however I question if it was part of your motivation. I would love to see a few good words from you on how all the top 50 deserve their standings, because any way you sum it up – all of the nominees are inspirational writers who give of themselves and are doing good for others. I apologize if I missed any positive mentions that you may have made about the honorees, I am not going to read through all of you points to see if I can find a silver lining.

            Steven, I came to the comments section today to THANK YOU for doing this! Thank you for recognizing me. Thank you for guiding me. I do not remember how I came upon this award to begin with. I did not vote. I was humbled to be nominated. I am honored to be on the list. Most of all, I am thrilled to have the opportunity to connect with all of the other bloggers who inspire me. I am pleased to have a chance to see areas in which I can improve my blog as well as the chance to meet even more people around the world who are good and honest and caring! You have done this for me and I think you are #1!

          • Yo Jamie,
            It’s true that Steven didn’t have to do this, and I don’t think I ever said he didn’t work really hard to do this.

            And to be frank with you I think that it kind of dismisses and belittles all his hard work to say that it’s “just a bit of fun”, and “not something ‘official'”, so it doesn’t matter how the scores were calculated. That’s just a cop-out.

            If that were the case Steven could have saved himself a whole week and just chosen the winners at random, or just made a link list. He didn’t have to post the methodology for how he calculated the scores either, but he did.

        • No matter how subjective or objective the contest was or wasn’t, most of us have tremendous respect for Steve’s objectivity and for his subjectivity. When a group of people respect the opinion of one of their own, they feel honored to be a part of the process he employed to identify them for special recognition. There was no money won. No donations were made or taxes collected to pay for a professionally run contest with levels of scrutiny and all objectivity removed. If a state-sponsored lottery awarded millions of other people’s money to someone using subjective criteria, it would be important to shine a light on the mistakes. But this? Really? With the tone of your first paragraph in your original comment?

          One blogger held a contest with clearly identified rules and criteria. Everyone knew going into it what each category would be worth. So yours would be conducted differently. His wasn’t. We participated knowing how votes would be counted and how klout would be scored. There are a million ways to run a contest. Why? Because there are a million things to identify as winning criteria. Steve chose a set that would remove some of the subjectivity that existed the last go-around. Perhaps it will be done differently next time. But if not, we loved being part of it and are honored to have been included.

          Thanks Steve!

          • Hey Ken,

            You know what, I’m not even going to get into it. You’re probably right.

            I made a couple of mistakes, which I’m happy to highlight:

            I thought that given that this is a site frequented by motivational bloggers, and given the kind of language motivational bloggers frequently use on their own sits, of all places this would be a forum in which a frank and no bs, no beating around the bush tone of voice wasn’t going to be a problem. Obviously that was wrong. I acknowledge that. I’m at fault.

            In his response to my post, Steve indicated comments like mine were useless since they offered no solutions, so I wrote a comment that had lots of suggestions. I thought that the people who go to this site would engage with it. Again, a mistake on my part. Nobody is interested in engaging with this kind of thing. Again, that’s fine – I was mistaken in thinking it was the case. I’ll acknowledge that as a mistake on my part too.

            Honestly, if I had known this was the kind of people who post here, I wouldn’t have written the comment in the first place. The only reason I did was because I respected everybody enough to assume they could take that kind of thing and run with it. And have fun doing it. That’s not the case, and thinking otherwise was my mistake too. I want to be clear, I’m not saying I respect everybody here any *less*. I’m just saying that you’re a different crowd than what I’m used to, and if I had known that I’d of either phrased things differently or kept my mouth shut. That’s my mistake too, and I have no shame in acknowledging that.

            For the record, I’ve sent Steve an email saying all this, and offering to continue the conversation offline if he’s interested. I’ve also politely asked that he delete my comments, since it’s evidently not going to do anything useful, and only piss people off, which wasn’t my intention. I still think I’ve made lots of good points, but evidently this isn’t the forum for those kinds of good points. Knowing that, I’m not about to yell and scream to try make it something it isn’t.

            Whether or not Steve deletes the entire thread is up to him, though I’m sure he will at least delete my comments as I have requested.

            Anyway, congratulations again to everyone.

        • It seems you made some good points, but I also think you need to get out more Nick, I’ve seen dissertations shorter than that ;-)

          NTW, thanks fro including me Steve, I forgot all about it until I saw the logo on another site.

  36. Dear Steven

    Thank you ever so kindly once again for putting so much of your time and effort to put together this wonderful list, and share the work of so many amazing people out there to help others live the best life ever.

    And what a pleasant surprise to be included as well! Thank you.

    Finally, a big thank you goes out also to all of the bloggers who give so much of themselves to provide value in the world, and influence positive change on our planet. It is beautiful to see!

  37. Congrats to all the winners and nominees! So many amazing blogs from all around the world to help us become our best. Looking forward to reading your posts and getting to know the inspiring writers :)

    Thank you Steven for all your hard work and especially for connecting us all. You really are creating a positive network among all the other fantastic work you are doing.

    Thank you for your feedback and I’m honoured to have made the list :)

  38. Steve, I’m so incredibly honored by this! Thank you so very, very much. I was happy just to be on the list last year and now this! Wow. And I can’t wait to check out all the other blogs. There are some great friends on the list, but quite a few I don’t yet know.

    Thanks for all your hard work. This has to be a monster project.

    Huge happy shiny puppy hugs!!

    Melody :)

    • Melody is fantastic , in fact (don’t tell her though , I like her head just the way it is)I consider her my own personal Angel , no question I ever ask is ignored and I’ve asked some dozzy’s but she is always there when you need her Super Hugs , shiny puppies and all.

  39. Thank you Steve – I am thrilled to be a part of your prestigious list of top personal development blogs this year! I’ve been working to finish my latest book, and didn’t even realize the list was out until I heard from Steve Borgman, who also made the list – in fact I have to give Steve full credit for inspiring me to participate this year. Thanks again, especially for all your hard work and for inspiring us all.

  40. Hi Steve,

    Congratulations on all the hard work you have put into this. It’s a really fun process!

    Thanks so much for the quality score. To have the third highest score on the board means so much to me. Considering my site is only a few months old, I’m hoping my other scores will only continue to go up as well!

    Congratulations to all other Top 50 winners as well! Fantastic to see so many high quality sites out there all with the same aim of helping others live better lives.

  41. It’s great to make it on the list after only 4 and a half months (at the top I might add) ;-)

    Also thanks for the ‘quality’ score as I pride myself in trying to make my blog look as clean and professional as possible. Especially as I’ve had to learn how to make my own logos, figure out how to use code and other bits and pieces that drove me insane.

    Hopefully I can make my way up the list in time for next year!!

  42. Wow Steve, what an amazing thing it is that you have put together and i was thrilled to get you message that mine I was included, especially as blogging has not been my top focus this year, that is changing in 2013. Gratitude for all that you do. Congrats to the winners Melody and Michael

  43. Congratulations to all of the those listed, particularly someone I admire greatly, Jodi Chapman.

    Steven, what a wonderful idea! Being completely new to the blogging world I’m still discovering the awesome content available and the many brilliant writers there are that are making such a difference in the world. Thanks for compiling this so I can dig into the treasure chest with a lot more ease.

  44. This was a great contest Steven, thank you for exposing everyone to such great content in the personal development space! I’m looking forward to connecting with everyone here!

  45. Yay! Thank you so much, Steve, for this labor of love. I can only imagine the hours that went into systematically choosing the winners, and we all appreciate you so much!
    Congrats to Melody, Michael, and everyone else who made the list! I love seeing so many amazing friends here, and I am excited to explore the blogs that are new to me.
    A huge thank you for including me – I’m so grateful to be here and will share it proudly on Soul Speak!
    Big hug to you!

    • Ah! thanks Jodi.

      Congratulations to you

      I only wish Dan could have been on there as well, tell him he was number 63 and only 10 points of getting into top 50 :)

      • Thanks for letting me know! Dan is an amazing writer with a huge heart, and I have a feeling he’ll be here next year. :) For now, we’ll share this award because seriously without his support I wouldn’t be able to do what I do.

        Happy holidays to you and your family! :)

  46. Congratulations to all the personal development bloggers on this list. I’m proud of each one of you, and I look forward to getting to know each of you better in the coming year. And thank you, Steve, for your hard work getting this together!

  47. What a huge honour it is to be ranked among these brilliant blogs! Thank you to Steve for your amazing contribution to the field of personal development – I can’t even imagine how much time this undertaking required. And much love to my readers who voted for Let ME Out!! and the Universe for bringing it to me at the perfect time. <3

  48. Thank you so much for including me in this wonderful list! I love the ranking system you came up with and it’s been great to find so many new blogs as a result of this list.

    • Glad you liked the ranking system Dani, it seems a lot fairer to take most of the subjectivity out of a contest like this. Congratulations to you (how hard was it to find your second name :) )

  49. Congrats guys and gals,

    What a fantastic list of websites. Thanks so much for including me and I wish everyone well with their online adventures.

    I feel sorry for all the work Steven has to do behind the scenes, but great job ;)

  50. Whoaaa! I am thrilled thrilled thrilled to see Melody at No.1. Love her. And so many fabulous people to go see, now. I am privileged to know so many people in the list.

    I am humbled to see my name here, in this list. I was busy getting people to vote for the others – and never once imagined I would feature in the nominations, leave alone the final list.

    As I said to you earlier on my blog, making this list strengthens my resolve to be the best person I can be, Steven.

    Here is a HUGE HUG to you for this amazing labor of love. It is so generous of you to devote hours of your time to call for nominations, process and do the million things to arrive at the final 50. Sending you love, Steven. Thank you.

    Congratulations, everyone!

    • I knew you would be thrilled Vidya, that’s why I couldn’t wait to tell you last night (my wife always says I can’t hold my own water :) ).

      Congrats on being so high up the list, I told you 15, I think, but I hadn’t updated the columns on the spreadsheet to show me true positions :)

      Giving a huge hug back Vidya, you’re doing great and I wish you all the best for next year.

  51. And how does one gets to be on this fine list next year? :)

    I write about personal development and Productivity/GTD on IQTELL’s Productivity Blog (pardon my seamless promotion).

Trackbacks

  1. […] her blogs have received recognition from various blogging communities. Her blog was voted #7 in the Top 50 personal development blogs of 2012 and most recently she received Indiblogger’s Award for the best Indian blog in the Personal […]

  2. […] I am thrilled to announce that I have here today, my soul-sister and dear friendPaige Burkes of Simple Mindfulness, where she writes about simple steps to a happier life, sharing her own experiences and lessons learned. She is an amazing person and is featured in the Top 50 Personal Development Bloggers of 2012. […]

  3. [...] keep up with, I went for a walk and reconnected with my spirituality by the water, and I read some inspirational blog posts to give me that extra [...]

  4. [...] in November I gave a TEDx talk about the pursuit of a dream. My website was voted the 3rd best Personal Development blog of 2012. People request to interview me. I was quoted on Oprah’s [...]

  5. [...] up, Steven Aitchison’s Top 50 Personal Development Blogs of 2012. I didn’t think I’d get enough votes for this one, especially since it was right before [...]

  6. [...] friend, Nitzan, sent me an email after finding my blog through Steve Aitchison’s Top 50 Personal Development Blogs.  He recommended Asnat as an ideal person to be interviewed in this series.  From his brief [...]

  7. [...] The 30 Year Old Ninja was voted the 3rd best personal development blog of 2012. [...]

  8. [...] might recall that The Start of Happiness ranked 30th in Steve Aitchison’s best personal development blogs of 2012 (and we had the third highest ‘quality’ [...]

  9. [...] The 2nd annual personal development blog awards from steven aitchison's CYT blog  [...]

  10. [...] in case you missed it, The Start of Happiness has scored in The Top 50 Personal Development Blogs of 2012! [...]

  11. [...] Dec 19 I am thrilled to announce that I have here today, my soul-sister and dear friend Paige Burkes of Simple Mindfulness, where she writes about simple steps to a happier life, sharing her own experiences and lessons learned. She is an amazing person and is featured in the Top 50 Personal Development Bloggers of 2012. [...]

  12. [...] to everyone who either nominated Ready to Bloom or voted  for this blog for The Top 50 Personal Development Blogs of 2012. Ready to Bloom made it as Number 33! Thanks for your [...]

  13. [...] If you would like to see the entire list, please click here! This entry was posted in personal growth, shared wisdom and tagged marilyn tam, personal growth, shared wisdom by Jodi – Soul Speak. Bookmark the permalink. [...]

  14. [...]  It’s been a great year!  Thank you all who helped me become #23 on the list of the “Top 50 Personal Development Blogs!”  I am so appreciative!  Thank you all for your support this past year.  2012 was a great [...]

  15. [...] to announce that Deliberate Receiving Blog has tied for first place in Steven Aitchison’s Top 50 Personal Development Blogs of 2012 contest. I was so honored to just make the list last year (I came in 26th thanks to your votes), and [...]

  16. [...] The 2nd annual personal development blog awards from steven aitchison's CYT blog (Good read!  [...]

  17. [...] found out earlier today that my blog Arianna’s Random Thoughts made the list (#14) of the Top 50 Personal Development Blogs of 2012.  I’m so humbled and thank you all from the bottom of my heart. You guys rock!  Here are [...]

  18. [...] It’s finally here: this years Top 50 Personal Development blogs of 2012.As you know I tried to do it a little different from last year to try and whittle the numbers down a bit.  Last year we had 200 nominees and this year we had 70 nominees.  [...]

  19. [...] The 2nd annual personal development blog awards from steven aitchison's CYT blog (Good read!  [...]

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